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Saturday, December 1, 2018

Blythe Island Bunnies

From Anastasia State Park it was a short jump over the Bridge of Lions into St Augustine. Stopping wasn't in our plan this time, but it is one of our favorite towns.

This Red Train waited at a light after picking up passengers at Castillo de San Marcos National Monument. The fort, completed in 1695, can be seen in the background.
Two hours later we exited I-95 at Brunswick, Georgia and pulled into Blythe Island Regional Park. A white rabbit lurking behind the van reminded me of a scene from Monty Python and the Holy Grail. We were offered a full service site, but noticed that there are "primitive" sites for far less, so asked if we could use one of those. Sure, as long as you will fit was the answer.
So, for $16.80 we chose site 18. There were only two other sites occupied in this 24 site section of the park.
We fit in the site without even needing to move the fire ring or picnic table.
Unlike the full service sites in the woods, our "primitive" site backed up to the river.
Another day, another Lexor. This twin belongs to Jack & Linda Dunnigan. We're stopping to visit them on Silver Girl, their winter sailing home.
Jack and Linda gave us a tour of Brunswick Landing Marina, their home port while they prepare for sailing south.

The clubhouse is a nice gathering spot.

Their porch gives a good view of one of the 15 groups of docks. Screening doesn't help the photo, but does keep the Georgia bugs away.
The marina is known up and down the east coast for having free beer.
But an even better amenity is a clean and free laundry room. Plus the marina owners have a great sense of humor.
Dunnigans recommended Marshside Grill for local seafood. The trawler docked behind the restaurant was a good sign and we weren't disappointed. We bumped into another sailing couple, Duane and Peg Siegfried on Wanderer, so were able to make new friends as the six of us swapped stories over fresh fish and shrimp. Thank you Jack and Linda for the tour and visit.
Crossing Fancy Bluff Creek after dinner brought us back to the campground where we enjoyed a lightning show before drifting off to sleep. We woke to showers and grey skies in the morning.
Speaking of showers, the campground had nice modern facilities back over in the full service area.
Cute cutouts made the park look festive.
And a shrimp litter sculpture advertised Georgia's most valuable water crop while urging folks to keep the waterways clean. Georgia shrimpers pull an average of  3.4 million pounds of shrimp from area waters every year. There was no mention of how much trash.

In the distance are two car carrying ships delivering new cars to a one of the largest terminals on the east coast.
The park does have a launch ramp for pleasure boats. With significant tides, you might wonder how to get boats in and out.

A "monorail" launch is their answer.

Hook your boat up to the lifts.
Use the remote control to power your boat down the monorail.
And gently lower your boat down to the floating dock. There's a video at the end of today's blog if you want to see more about this unique boat launch.
Having explored the park, it was time to visit the office and check out.
The covered porch provides a nice social area for people... and rabbits. We learned that one of the campground hosts breeds rabbits and they are allowed to roam the campground. Apparently they don't lose too many to gators or coyotes. This is a delightful campground with friendly people and some unique residents. The only drawback is an occasional whiff of sulphur from the paper plant up river.
Beth had to explain to this bunny that we didn't have any rabbit food before we were allowed to leave the park.
By five-thirty we were home in Durham trying to find our driveway through the fallen leaves. It was a good end to a fun twenty-nine nights of camping over the 2,432 miles of (mostly) Florida back roads.

Monorail launch video. We put videos at the end of blogs because blogger cuts off emails when it encounters a video.

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